Ohio is scaring me

mtierney said:

drummerboy said:

I'm not a huge fan of  older jazz (like 30's to 40's I guess) but I heard some great songs on that station. Mostly overnight.

Jazz was invented by Black and White musicians of the ‘30s-‘40s, here and in Europe. Django Reinhardt and Steven Grappeli (sp.?) , Louis Armstrong, etc are among the great names in Jazz. My husband collected every album, and cassette, even contacted dealers in England to obtain every recording possible. 

er, ok.

I'm a trumpet player. Louis Armstrong was one of my first idols as a child.

Jazz started a bit before the 30's, and there were few white musicians involved in its invention. Forget few - make that none.


Jaytee said:

mtierney said:

Jazz was invented by Black and White musicians of the ‘30s-‘40s, here and in Europe 

You have no idea what you’re talking about. It’s no wonder you think the way you do. Pure ignorance.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jazz

Jazz is a music genre that originated in the African-American communities of New Orleans, Louisiana in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, with its roots in blues and ragtime.[1][2][3][4] Since the 1920s Jazz Age, it has been recognized as a major form of musical expression in traditional and popular music. Jazz is characterized by swing and blue notes, complex chords, call and response vocals, polyrhythms and improvisation. Jazz has roots in European harmony and African rhythmic rituals.[5][6]


drummerboy said:

mtierney said:

drummerboy said:

I'm not a huge fan of  older jazz (like 30's to 40's I guess) but I heard some great songs on that station. Mostly overnight.

Jazz was invented by Black and White musicians of the ‘30s-‘40s, here and in Europe. Django Reinhardt and Steven Grappeli (sp.?) , Louis Armstrong, etc are among the great names in Jazz. My husband collected every album, and cassette, even contacted dealers in England to obtain every recording possible. 

er, ok.

I'm a trumpet player. Louis Armstrong was one of my first idols as a child.

Jazz started a bit before the 30's, and there were few white musicians involved in its invention. Forget few - make that none.

every time you pontificate, you show how misinformed you are..

“I've Found a New Baby
from Hot Club Quartette, Vol. 1
"Legendary" is the appropriate word here. Stephane Grappelli was born before WWI and continued to be an influence, and a concert draw, until just about the end of his life. (He died in 1997 at age 89.) His list of collaborators is long and includes the most respected names in jazz, as well as some we should know more about. His sound gave jazz an European sensibility, making listeners aware of their similarities rather than their differences. As for his massive repertoire, I'm partial to the Hot Club dates with Django Reinhardt.


mtierney said:

drummerboy said:

mtierney said:

drummerboy said:

I'm not a huge fan of  older jazz (like 30's to 40's I guess) but I heard some great songs on that station. Mostly overnight.

Jazz was invented by Black and White musicians of the ‘30s-‘40s, here and in Europe. Django Reinhardt and Steven Grappeli (sp.?) , Louis Armstrong, etc are among the great names in Jazz. My husband collected every album, and cassette, even contacted dealers in England to obtain every recording possible. 

er, ok.

I'm a trumpet player. Louis Armstrong was one of my first idols as a child.

Jazz started a bit before the 30's, and there were few white musicians involved in its invention. Forget few - make that none.

every time you pontificate, you show how misinformed you are..

“I've Found a New Baby
from Hot Club Quartette, Vol. 1
"Legendary" is the appropriate word here. Stephane Grappelli was born before WWI and continued to be an influence, and a concert draw, until just about the end of his life. (He died in 1997 at age 89.) His list of collaborators is long and includes the most respected names in jazz, as well as some we should know more about. His sound gave jazz an European sensibility, making listeners aware of their similarities rather than their differences. As for his massive repertoire, I'm partial to the Hot Club dates with Django Reinhardt.

Django Reinhardt with the Hot Club Quintet
John Fordham
John Fordham
Thu 16 Jun 2011 19.45 EDT
In 1928, at 18, Belgian gypsy musician Django Reinhardt lost the use of the third and fourth fingers of his left hand in a caravan fire, forcing him to abandon both the violin and banjo and concentrate on the guitar, playing solos with only his index and second finger. He developed a unique style full of vibrato-humming fast runs, piano-like trills and sax-like speed. Reinhardt later led the celebrated Quintette du Hot Club de France with violinist Stéphane Grappelli, toured the US in 1947 with Duke Ellington, and is regarded as Europe's first jazz improvising genius.


"In the years after the fire, Reinhardt was rehabilitating and experimenting on the guitar that his brother had given him. After having played a broad spectrum of music, he was introduced to American jazz by an acquaintance, Émile Savitry, whose record collection included such musical luminaries as Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, and Joe Venuti and Eddie Lang."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Django_Reinhardt#Discovery_of_jazz

I know it's only Wikipedia, but it's a start if anyone wants to explore further.


mtierney said:

drummerboy said:

mtierney said:

drummerboy said:

I'm not a huge fan of  older jazz (like 30's to 40's I guess) but I heard some great songs on that station. Mostly overnight.

Jazz was invented by Black and White musicians of the ‘30s-‘40s, here and in Europe. Django Reinhardt and Steven Grappeli (sp.?) , Louis Armstrong, etc are among the great names in Jazz. My husband collected every album, and cassette, even contacted dealers in England to obtain every recording possible. 

er, ok.

I'm a trumpet player. Louis Armstrong was one of my first idols as a child.

Jazz started a bit before the 30's, and there were few white musicians involved in its invention. Forget few - make that none.

every time you pontificate, you show how misinformed you are..

“I've Found a New Baby
from Hot Club Quartette, Vol. 1
"Legendary" is the appropriate word here. Stephane Grappelli was born before WWI and continued to be an influence, and a concert draw, until just about the end of his life. (He died in 1997 at age 89.) His list of collaborators is long and includes the most respected names in jazz, as well as some we should know more about. His sound gave jazz an European sensibility, making listeners aware of their similarities rather than their differences. As for his massive repertoire, I'm partial to the Hot Club dates with Django Reinhardt.

oh my dear, you don't know squat. You are trying, for some unknown reason, to whitewash the birth of jazz.

Grapelli , while a great musician, was not an inventor of the genre.


drummerboy said:

oh my dear, you don't know squat. You are trying, for some unknown reason, to whitewash the birth of jazz.


Only in your way of thinking, db.

Jazz was not “invented” but grew after WW1, the chaos of the Roaring ‘20s, the Great Depression, morphing into Hitler’s destruction of Europe and the start of WW2 . Prohibition  created  a venue of clubs where Jazz  was the people’s music of survival. Black and white musicians joined forces and made music.


mtierney said:

Only in your way of thinking, db.

Jazz was not “invented” but grew after WW1, the chaos of the Roaring ‘20s, the Great Depression, morphing into Hitler’s destruction of Europe and the start of WW2 . Prohibition  created  a venue of clubs where Jazz  was the people’s music of survival. Black and white musicians joined forces and made music.

Just like Elvis, Bill Haley, and Bobby Darin invented rock & roll. 


mtierney said:

drummerboy said:

oh my dear, you don't know squat. You are trying, for some unknown reason, to whitewash the birth of jazz.

Only in your way of thinking, db.

Jazz was not “invented” but grew after WW1, the chaos of the Roaring ‘20s, the Great Depression, morphing into Hitler’s destruction of Europe and the start of WW2 . Prohibition  created  a venue of clubs where Jazz  was the people’s music of survival. Black and white musicians joined forces and made music.

I admire the fact that you're actually trying to have a discussion here, but OMG you're so wrong. For some reason, you're defining the start of jazz after white people started playing it.

Which I guess is pretty consistent with your other points of view.


Vanilla ice invented rap music….


mtierney said:

drummerboy said:

oh my dear, you don't know squat. You are trying, for some unknown reason, to whitewash the birth of jazz.

Only in your way of thinking, db.

Jazz was not “invented” but grew after WW1, the chaos of the Roaring ‘20s, the Great Depression, morphing into Hitler’s destruction of Europe and the start of WW2 . Prohibition  created  a venue of clubs where Jazz  was the people’s music of survival. Black and white musicians joined forces and made music.

and another thing. black and white musicians didn't join forces publicly (at least in America) until the late 30's.

(first integrated band seems to be a Benny Goodman quartet in 1937)

and "the people's music of survival"?

whut?


Jaytee said:

Vanilla ice invented rap music….

don't forget House of Pain. 


ml1 said:

don't forget House of Pain. 

I thought it was Blondie. 


jfinnegan said:

I thought it was Blondie. 

hey… don’t forget Johnny cash 


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